ancient culture

Ishtar’s Placement in the Cult of the Dead

We have made another thrilling discovery!

It will verify that the Cult of the Dead was well known in ancient Sumer and Babylonia, and therefore it will confirm the authenticity of a certain part of the Simon Necronomicon. It will also allow us to translate a famous passage from English to Sumerian, and it will allow us to understand a particular Sumerian sentence, as well as it will let us correct this sentence, for it contains errors. Also revealed will be Ishtar’s place in the rites of the Cult of the Dead.

In the Atlantean Necronomicon written by Warlock Asylum the following is said about the Cult of the Dead, on page 60:

The Mad Arab speaks about a peculiar “cult” that existed in ancient times. An example of this can be seen in the opening of the MAGAN Text:

“The verses here following come from the secret text of some of the priests of a cult which is all that is left of the Old Path that existed before Babylon was built..,”

The Mad Arab mentioned a “cult” that existed before Babylon was built on another occasion. He is referring to the Cult of the Dead. The passage that appears in the URILIA Text verifies this:

“Bread of the Cult of the Dead in its Place I eat…”

The words above can be found on page 198 of the Simon Necronomicon in the following passage which begins on page 197:

“And when thou hast set out bread for the dead to eat, remember to pour honey thereupon, for it is pleasing to the Goddess Whom No One Worshippeth, Who wanders by night through the streets amid the howling of the dogs and the wailing of the infants, for in Her time a great Temple was built unto Her and sacrifices of infants made that She might save the City from the Enemies who dwelt without. And the Number of infants thus slain is countless and unknowable. And She did save that City, but it was taken soon thereafter when the people no more offered up their children. And when the people made to offer again, at the time of the attack, the Goddess turned her back and fled from her temple, and it is no more. And the Name of the Goddess is no more known. And She maketh the infants restless, and to cry, so the reason for the pouring of the honey over the sacred bread, for it is written”:

  • “Bread of the Cult of the Dead in its Place I eat
  • In the Court prepared
  • Water of the Cult of the Dead in its Place I drink
  • A Queen am I, Who has become estranged to the Cities
  • She that comes from the Lowlands in a sunken boat
  • Am I.
  • I AM THE VIRGIN GODDESS
  • HOSTILE TO MY CITY
  • A STRANGER IN MY STREETS.
  • MUSIGAMENNA URUMA BUR ME YENSULAMU GIRME EN!
  • Oh, Spirit, who understand thee? Who comprehend Thee?

The passage above has always interested me greatly, and I have studied this piece of text many times. Even though Warlock Asylum explains part of this passage in the Atlantean Necronomicon Deluxe Edition, I was still not sure if the passage came from authentic ancient writing.

But it does!

I have just come upon a work that contains various transliterations and translations of ancient Sumerian and Babylonian cuneiform texts, and I was amazed to find that it contained the famous passage about the Cult of the Dead.

It truly is ancient!

It can be found as part of a longer incantation in the book Sumerian and Babylonian Psalms written by Stephen Langdon 1876-1937, on page 10 and 11.

The incantation is made up of 28 lines, but unfortunately it is badly damaged and only 10 lines can be read in full. As luck would have it the passage we find in the Necronomicon is excellently preserved.

It can be found at the end of the incantation, lines 23 to 28, which reads as follows in Sumerian:

  • 23. Ú KI-SIG-GA KI-BI-TA Ú-KÚ ME-EN
  • 24. TÙR-ZUR-BI A-NAK-AN ME-EN
  • 25. GA-SA-AN ME-EN MU-LU GIR-DÚR-ÚRU-A KÚR-RA ME-EN
  • 26. SAL-TUK-KI SUG-GA MÁ-SU-A ME-EN
  • 27. NIGIN-GA-A AMBAR-RA BA-AN NIGIN-NA ME-EN
  • 28. MU-GIG-MEN ÚRU-MÀ BUR ME EN SILA-MU GIR ME-EN

The English translation is as follows:

  • 23. Bread of the cult of the dead in its place I eat.
  • 24. In the court prepared, water of the cult of the dead I drink.
  • 25. A queen am I, who has become estranged to the market places.
  • 26. She that cares for the lowlands, in a sunken boat, am I.
  • 27. She that entraps all the fish of the pools, am I.
  • 28. I am the virgin goddess, hostile to my city, a stranger in my streets.

We can see that the passage from the Necronomicon is slightly differently written than the passage that is found on the cuneiform tablet. Yet, it is certainly one and the same. However, the passage in the Necronomicon contains the following line:

“MUSIGAMENNA URUMA BUR ME YENSULAMU GIRME EN”

This line is not only written incorrectly, but it also has no proper place in the passage because it means:

I am the virgin goddess, hostile to my city, a stranger in my streets.”

And that would make it twice in a row that those words are stated (once in English and once in Sumerian), which makes no real sense. As I said, it is also written incorrectly for it should read:

MU-GIG-MEN ÚRU-MÀ BUR ME EN SILA-MU GIR ME-EN”

We have now come to the last issue that we would discuss in this article. We have already established that the Cult of the Dead was well known in ancient Sumer and Babylonia because of the proof we’ve found in this ancient cuneiform text. We have translated the famous passage from English to Sumerian, and we have learned the meaning of the Sumerian sentence, as well as corrected its errors. So now it is time to examine Ishtar’s place in these rites that concerned themselves with the Cult of the Dead.

The passage reads:

“I AM THE VIRGIN GODDESS”

Warlock Asylum writes the following about this in his Atlantean Necronomicon Deluxe Edition, on page 174:

Many Initiates of the Necronomicon Tradition have often wondered what “goddess” is the Mad Arab talking about? The answer to this question can be found in E.A. Wallis Budge’s book Amulets and Superstitions. Budge states the following on page 115-116:

“The female devil in the boat is LAMASHTU, whose home in the infernal regions whenche she comes when she arrives on the earth to carry out her campaign of slaughter and death. The only way to stop her from carrying out her baneful plans is to get her back again in the Underworld, and it is necessary to coax her to leave earth by promising to give her gifts…. She must then make her way over the mountains which block the road to hell, and when this is done she must cross the river of hell, which is none other than the great World-Ocean, Nar Marratu.”

Warlock Asylum’s observation is a keen one, for I do also possess Budge’s work and, after having done my own research, I have come to the same conclusion. However, the cuneiform text where this passage originates from seems to address a different goddess altogether… For it speaks of Ishtar!

The first five lines of the ancient cuneiform text, though badly damaged, make mention of the great Queen of Heaven and Earth, and are as follows:

  • 01. …………………………………… Ištar who is like unto me?
  • 02. ……………………………………… who is like unto me?
  • 03. Begetting, mother who knows lamentation, who abides among her people.
  • 04. Queen … great queen ……….. who abides among her people.
  • 05. Queen ……………. queen Ištar ……… who abides among her people

Because Ishtar is mentioned at the very beginning of this incantation it is safe to assume that she had a close connection to the meaning of the incantation. There is made no mention of Lamashtu, yet I know that the findings of Warlock Asylum are correct.

Could it then be that Ishtar and Lamashtu are one and the same?

I do believe they are….

And I found an interesting footnote at line 24 which supports my opinion. It reads as follows:

“Ištar, as the deity to whom the rites for the dead were sacred, appears in her character of goddess of the underworld.”

This footnote tells us that in the rites concerning the Cult of the Dead a different aspect of Ishtar appears, that is the aspect of goddess of the Underworld.

In that particular aspect she would be similar to Lamashtu….

The great Goddess Inanna has many forms, great and powerful all!

Nightcaller.

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10 replies »

  1. This is a great article. I think its some of your best work to date and it helped answer a question that I recently as the Watcher, but was also noted by Initiate Starintelligence. Prior to the passage cited in the Simon Necronomicon that is discussed in your article, we read the following:

    “Who wanders by night through the streets amid the howling of the dogs and the wailing of the infants, for in Her time a great Temple was built unto Her and sacrifices of infants made that She might save the City from the Enemies who dwelt without. And the Number of infants thus slain is countless and unknowable. And She did save that City, but it was taken soon thereafter when the people no more offered up their children.”
    The sacrifice of children mention in the above passage is semen, metaphorically described as “children.” Simon also writes about this in Dead Names. On page 241 we read:

    “The accusations agianst Crowley’s alledged human sacrifices died down…when it was realized he was peaking allegorically.”

    We can now ascerain that the incantation that appears in the Urilia text is the that is used for sacrificing semen to Ishtar. Excellent work!

    Like

  2. Thank you Brother. 🙂 I was also very pleased with this discovery, and am wondering what will come next…. This discovery shows us also that the author of the Necronomicon made use of the works of Stephen Langdon, for it is the second work wherein we can find material that is found in the Necronomicon. You should check out the article about the small exorcism! It is also a work from Stephen Langdon, and has definitely been the source of our small exorcism…

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  3. Well Jyotishmoy, if I understand correctly the great Kali is also a “chthonic” deity. It may vary well be that these practices originated from the same ancient source….

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  4. Actually She is Too Huge to tag as “chthonic”; during my encounters with her, sometimes She is Too sweet and some times She is Too Ferocious.

    Well, may be there might be a common source ….

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  5. Whatever the case, She is a great Goddess! You are very lucky to have been brought up in Her ways. 😉

    It shows us, however, that the sacrifice of semen is an ancient practice that is applied by different races and religions.

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  6. Great work & research, Nightcaller! Your work has really opened up the system for all of us & you should be applauded!

    Like

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