Assyrian

The Proper Translation of the Incantation of Protection against the Workers of the Ancient Ones

Greetings!

Some of you may remember a previous article of mine concerning the Incantation of Protection against the Workers of the Ancient Ones. If you do you should know that I have been partly mistaken because I have come upon new information that renders my previous article to be somewhat incorrect. My apologies…

Although I managed to translate more than half of the incantation I was dissatisfied with the results and I continued my research. And now, in the early hours of the first day of a new week, my continued efforts finally payed off.

I have found the true source of our incantation as well as a full translation!

At first I assumed that our incantation was based on the Maqlu tablets because those tablets contained a number of lines that make up the incantation. But I was wrong and therefore I was unable to locate the missing lines! The incantation did not directly originate from the Maqlu tablets, but from a Semitic text that in itself was based on the Maqlu serie.

Once again this discovery shows us that the author of the Necronomicon knew his trade well because the material he provided to us comes from excellent sources. He seems to have been fond of the works of Stephen Langdon, but does not mention this in the bibliography list which is somewhat of a shame because Langdon’s works are superb and much of his material has served as a source for the Book of the Black Earth.

The Incantation of Protection against the Workers of the Ancient Ones (page 86 of the Simon Necronomicon) was constructed from several lines that are part of a larger text which is called Prayers and Incantations of Shamash-shum-ukin which can be found in the work Publications of the Babylonian Section Volume X from the University of Pennsylvania – the University Museum 1915-1919 written by Stephen Langdon.

Page 193 of Langdon’s work tells us the following about the text from which our incantation is constructed:

“This important Semitic text contains a long incantation against wizards and witches accompanied by a ritual which continued for two days. The unusually long incantation written for Shamas-shum-ukin is based upon those contained in the great Maklu series, a series in which symbolic magic by burning images and other objects in fire constitutes the characteristic rites. In fact nearly every line of this prayer composed for Shamash-shum-ukin can be paralleled by passages in the Maklu series, many parts of which are restored from our text. The chief feature of the ritual which accompanied this prayer is the burning of fifteen images of the various demons and evil spirits which had tormented the king. The tablet has already formed the subject of a popular article in the Museum Journal, Vol. VII, No. 4.”

The first line of our Incantation of Protection can be found on the reverse of the tablet mentioned above which is page 198 of Langdon’s work, line 10.

Šamaš ša kaš-šà-pi-ia kaš-šap-ti-ia e-piš-ia muš-te-piš-ti-ia
(May Shamash break the sorcery of my sorcerer and my sorceress,my wizard and my witch,)

Line 15 is the second sentence of our incantation.

ki-ma ti-nur ku-tur-šu-nu li-rim
(Like a furnace may he quench their smoke)

Line 16 is the third sentence of our incantation.

li-hu-lu li-zu-bu u li-ta-at-tu-ku
(May they melt, glow and run away)

Line 17 is the fourth sentence of our incantation.

e-piš-ta-šu-nu kima mê na-a-du ina ti-ki lik-tu
(May their deeds, like the water of a leather pouch by pouring, cease)

Line 18 is the fifth sentence of our incantation.

šu-nu li-mu-tu-ma ana-ku lu-ub-lut
(May they die and I live)

Line 19 is the sixth sentence of our incantation.

šu-nu li-ni-šu-ma ana-ku lu-ud-nin
(May they quake and I stand fast)

Line 20 is the seventh sentence of our incantation.

šu-nu li-ik-ti-su-ma ana-ku lu-up-pa-tar
(May they be bound and I be freed)

Line 27 is the eigth sentence of our incantation.

tirra-ma sa-lu-ti ša kaššapti ša ru-hi-e i-pu-šu
(Turn away the enmity of the sorceress who has employed venom)

Line 28 and part of line 27 are the ninth sentence of our incantation.

šu-pi-i ar-kiš up-pu-uš
(Make clean quickly the one bewitched)

The last sentence of our incantation is not found in Langdon’s text and the findings thereof, given in my previous article may still apply.

Translated the incantation now reads:

May Shamash break the sorcery of my sorcerer and my sorceress, my wizard and my witch!
Like a furnace may he quench their smoke!
May they melt, glow and run away!
May their deeds, like the water of a leather pouch by pouring, cease!
May they die and I live!
May they quake and I stand fast!
May they be bound and I be freed!
Turn away the enmity of the sorceress who has employed venom!
Make clean quickly the one bewitched!
ZI DINGIR GAL KESHSHEBA KANPA!

Now that we are finally able to understand this incantation we can see that it is pretty awesome!

The author of the Necronomicon has expertly constructed a powerful incantation by taking various strong sentences from a long. largely obsolete text, yet still drawing on the power of the ancient tongue.

I like this one very much!

Nightcaller.

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4 replies »

  1. your Tenacity should be Bottled and sold….you would be able to retire comfortably, my Brother. thanks for the follow up on your post. you never cease to amaze me with your offerings here. Thank You.

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  2. Thank you Brother! I was very pleased with this discovery too. 🙂

    All this research seems to be part of the Gate-Walking process as it leads to a greater understanding of the Tome and its current.

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  3. Yeah, I’m working on the book, but I have new information which replaces the damaged text I work from. So I have to revise all eight tablets which is quite a lot of work. It will, however, improve my work. 🙂

    Like

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