Akkadian

Teachings of the Fire Cult – On Curses and Counter Measures

at-ti man-nu kaššaptu šá tub-ta-na-in-ni
( Who art thou, witch, who continually seekest me out? )

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

Those of you who are versed in our ways will be aware that the vocation of being a priest encompasses a broad spectrum of magickal practices that one must learn to master, or at least must understand. These magickal practices can be classed as belonging to various subdivisions known as cults. The magickal knowledge contained within our initiatory tome, the Necronomicon, largely belongs to three main cults, that being the Water-Cult, the Fire-Cult, and the Cult of the Dead. In this post, however, we will only discuss material that is relevant to the Fire-Cult, the rites of Maqlu, of the burnings and the bindings.

As we all know, the Maklu text within the Simon Necronomicon is an assorted text, consisting of incantations that originate from various series of cuneiform tablets, and not just the tablets belonging to the serie Maqlu. My research has shown that Simon made use of the original Maqlu tablets throughout the book, though I must honestly admit that mistakes were made, perhaps deliberately. These “errors” are of great significance, for they render the spells and incantations impotent, as it is of the utmost importance that the words of the ancient tongue are pronounced correctly, for a textual error, even if it’s only a single letter, changes the entire meaning of the word, rendering it impotent. During my studies I have corrected a variety of such textual errors, yet I have found, and corrected, one that has eluded me for a very long time. It can be found on page 214 of the Simon Necronomicon, at the end of the following instructions:

And if thou knowest the names of they who would harm thee, write them upon figures of wax, made in their image, upon which you will make the Curse and melt them in the cauldron you have set up within the MANDAL of protection. And the Watcher will carry the Curse to them for whom it was uttered. And they will die.
 And if thou does not know of their names, nor of their persons, save that they seek to harm thee,  make a doll of wax like a man, with his limbs, but with no face. And upon the face of the doll write the word KASHSHAPTI. Hold the doll over the flaming cauldron while saying fiercely over it:

ATTI MANNU KASHSHAPTU SHA TUYUB TA ENNI!

No translation was given by Simon of the single line above, which is a shame, as it is very important to know the meaning of any commands given in the ancient tongue. Fortunately my hard labour and intense studies will resolve this problem, as I will not only present the reader with an English translation of this sentence, but also the correct version of this command which is written in the Assyrian language. It can be found on the second Maqlu tablet, line 206, and reads as follows:

AT-TI MAN-NU KAŠŠAPTU ŠÁ TUB-TA-NA-IN-NI

It translates to English like this:

Who art thou, witch, who continually seekest me out?

The translation of this sentence leads us to the second point of interest, which can be found in the Simon Necronomicon, on page 215 and 216, and reads as follows:

Or thou mayest call upon ISHTAR to protect thee from the spells of sorcery. And for this, the MANDAL must be prepared as always, and a figure of ISHTAR be upon the altar, and incantations made to summon Her assistance, like the following incantation that is ancient, from the Priests of UR:

WHO ART THOU, O WITCH, THAT SEEKEST ME?
Thou hast taken the road
Thou hast come after me
Thou hast sought me continually for my destruction
Thou hast continually plotted an evil thing against me
Thou hast encompassed me
Thou hast sought me out
Thou hast gone forth and followed my steps
But I, by the command of the Queen ISHTAR
Am clothed in terror
Am armed in fiercesomeness
Am arrayed with might and the Sword
I make thee tremble
I make thee run afraid
I drive thee out
I spy thee out
I cause thy name to be known among men
I cause thy house to be seen among men
I cause thy spells to be heard among men
I cause thy evil perfumes to be smelt among men
I unclothe thy wickedness and evil
And bring your sorceries to naught!
It is not I, but NANAKANISURRA
Mistress of Witches
And the Queen of heaven ISHTAR
Who command thee!

We can see that the first sentence of this incantation is the very same as the command given on page 214 of the Simon Necronomicon. So let us try and see if we can translate this incantation to the Assyrian language.

  • WHO ART THOU, O WITCH, THAT SEEKEST ME?
  • at-ti man-nu kaššaptu šá tub-ta-na-in-ni
  • ( Second Maqlu Tablet, line 206, reads as: Who are you, witch, who visits me continuously?)
  • Thou hast taken the road
  • al-ki ul i-di
  • ( Second Maqlu Tablet, line 209, should read: I don’t know your city )
  • Thou hast come after me
  • bit-ki ul i-di
  • ( Second Maqlu Tablet, line 209, should read: I don’t know your house )
  • Thou hast sought me continually for my destruction
  • a-na li-mut-ti taš-te-ni-’-in-ni
  • ( Second Maqlu Tablet, line 207, reads as: Who continuously looks for me with evil intentions? )
  • Thou hast continually plotted an evil thing against me
  • a-na la ta-ab-ti ta-as-sa-na-ah-hur-in-ni
  • ( Second Maqlu Tablet, line 208, reads as: Who continuouslly looks for me with unfavorable intentions? )
  • Thou hast encompassed me
  • šum-ki ul i-di
  • ( Second Maqlu Tablet, line 209, should read: I don’t know your name )
  • Thou hast sought me out
  • šu-bat-ki ul i-di
  • ( Second Maqlu Tablet, line 209, should read: I don’t know your residence )
  • Thou hast gone forth and followed my steps
  • i-mu-ra-an-ni-ma kaššaptu il-li-ka arki-ia
  • ( Third Maqlu Tablet, line 13, reads as: The witch saw me, she followed me )
  • But I, by the command of the Queen ISHTAR
  • Am clothed in terror
  • Am armed in fiercesomeness
  • Am arrayed with might and the Sword
  • I make thee tremble
  • I make thee run afraid
  • I drive thee out
  • I spy thee out
  • I cause thy name to be known among men
  • I cause thy house to be seen among men
  • I cause thy spells to be heard among men
  • I cause thy evil perfumes to be smelt among men
  • I unclothe thy wickedness and evil
  • And bring your sorceries to naught!
  • It is not I, but NANAKANISURRA
    Mistress of Witches
    And the Queen of heaven ISHTAR
    Who command thee!
  • ina qí-bit ištar dumu-zi na-na-a be-lit ra-a-mi
  • ù ka-ni-sur-ra be-lit kaššapâti
  • ( Fifth Maqlu Tablet, lines 59 and 60, reads as: Upon the order of Ištar, Tammuz, Nanaya, the Mistress of Love, and of Kanisurra, the Mistress of Sorceresses! )

Unfortunately we still miss the translation of the  greater part of this incantation, as the untranslated lines either cannot be found, or are of such difference that translating them in such manner would make no sense. Perhaps this matter can be solved in the future.

Stay blessed!

Dumu Abzu-a.

 

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4 replies »

  1. I really enjoyed this
    it answered a question I had on my mind, that nobody could fathom
    I wrote on my floor in ma sking tape last night
    (about 5×5 feet)
    who art thou?
    and I think in my humble opinion
    that the witch that was stalking me, was an aspect of myself that I couldnt accept
    it opened doors long shut
    and that’s what it should be

    Like

  2. Thank you very much!

    It may indeed occur that one battles a negative aspect of the self. I had this happen several times and it does indeed feel as if one has been the target of witchcraft. But in these modern times the witches and warlocks of old often take a different form. You might want to think about people who seek to halt you in your development, or who seek to bring you down through subterfuge and petty gossip, for their negative thoughtforms are a kind of magick too, and will affect you over a longer period of time.

    Like

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