Necronomicon

Terminological Analysis of the Necronomicon Part 3 – Invocation of the Ninib Gate

Wafubeh to all!

Today we will be breaking down some of the sentences of “barbarous” words found in the Simon Necronomicon. These sentences are found in The Invocation of the Ninib Gate, and reads as follows:

“IA ZI BATTU BA ALLU”

Now let us take into account that these texts are primarily based on interacting with Sumero-Babylonian energies, and as such it will allow us to tap into that specific current. Therefore it is safe to say that when examining the barbarous words we should try and validate their meanings as close to the Sumerian originals as possible. When we are succesful at such an attempt, the result will reveal to us a translation that is in accordance with the corresponding deity, or energy.

IA

I am convinced that in these kind of phrases the word “IA” is used as an interjection, starting the sentence as “O!“, or “Hail!“, adressing a specific deity, or spirit.

ZI

As previously discussed this word means “Spirit“.

Sofar it has become clear that we are adressing a specific spirit or energy.

BATTU

On page 5, of “Syllabaire Cunéiforme (1901)” by C. Fossey, at cuneiform sign number 70, we can see that the phonetic value of the word “BATTU” equals the ideographic value of the word “bêlu“, meaning “Lord“.

We interpret its meaning sofar as: “Hail, Spirit Lord!

The work of Fossey proves to be very helpful in deciphering the meaning of the next word too and will, without a doubt, give proper meaning to this arcane phrase.

BA

Still on page 5 of Fossey’s great work, at cuneiform sign 77, we are able to learn that the phonetic value of the word “BA” equals the ideographic value of “NINIB” itself.

Hail, Spirit Lord Ninib!

I am of the opinion that the next and last word of this no longer obscure phrase should be broken down in two separate words, these being “AL” and “LU“.

You will see why this makes sense when both their meanings become clear.

AL

The “Sumer-Aryan Dictionary“, by L. Austine Waddell, tells us that the meaning of the word “AL” can be: Guard, keep, protect, preserve.

LU

Back to Fossey’s work, on page 17, at cuneiform sign 290, we see that the phonetic value of the word “LU” equals the ideographic value of the word “amèlu“, meaning “man“.

Therefore the word “AL-LU” can be interpreted as “protect man“.

IA ZI BATTU BA ALLU

“Hail, Spirit-Lord Ninib, who protects man!”

These words make sense, as such phrases are very commonly found in the Sumero-Babylonian hymns, prayers, and liturgies.

IA DUK

Another greeting it seems, one to which we are also able to give meaning.

IA

We discussed this above, and have come to the conclusion that it is very likely an interjection, meaning “O!“, or “Hail!“.

DUK

According to Waddell’s work, as cited above, the term “DUK” is translated as “leader“.

Hail, leader!

With the help of Fossey’s work we are able to break down another one of the barbarous words in this invocation. This phrase should likewise be broken down into two seperate words.

AZZAGBAT

The first word should read as “AZAG“.

AZAG

On page 26 of Fossey’s work, at cuneiform sign 420, we can see that the phonetic value of the word “AZAG” is equal to the ideographic value of the word “êllu“, meaning “brilliant, bright, shining“.

BAT

Like the term “BATTU“, as discussed above, the phonetic value of the word “BAT” also equals the ideographic value of the word “bêlu“, meaning “Lord“.

Brilliant Lord!”, or “Shining Lord!”.

The arcane gibberish has now been given meaning that is again in accordance as to how these energies were often described.

IA ANDARRA

This phrase is very interesting, and again corresponds to Ninib in a strong way.

IA

We discussed this above, and have come to the conclusion that it is very likely an interjection, meaning “O!“, or “Hail!“.

The word “ANDARRA” should be broken down again like this:

AN

In Waddel’s work we see that “AN” can mean “high, heaven, star, god, king, lord, etc.

DARA

The same work gives us the meaning of the word “DARA“, that being a “stag“.

Heavenly Stag!

And as it so happens, the stag is a symbol of Ninib!

The first lines of this invocation can now be understood as:

“Hail, Leader! Hail, Heavenly Stag! Hail, Spirit-Lord Ninib, who protects man!”

Dumu Abzu-a
01-10-2017

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s