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Art of Ninzuwu Part 5: Mazoku (Oya Ni Ninu Ko Wa Onigo) Is Now on YouTube

Peace and Blessing! We would like to welcome everyone to the Art of Ninzuwu blog page. If this is your first time here, please feel free to review some of our previous articles, and share your experience and insights by posting a comment. Have a blessed day!

We are happy to announce that another educational video, in our digital theatre series, can now be seen on YouTube. Art of Ninzuwu Part 5: Mazoku (Oya Ni Ninu Ko Wa Onigodiscusses some of the many challenges that some Ninzuwu practitioners may have faced in the past.

Mazoku, the original term was used in Japanese transliteration of the Indian (Hindu) mythology‘s clan Asura and Yaksha, as well as Zoroastrianism‘s Daeva, and is the general term for devils, demons and evil beings. The term is used in the form of separating these supernatural entities from the devils and demons in Christianity and Oni of Japanese local mythology. In polytheism, it is simply a word used as an Antonym of 神族 (shinzoku), which means literally the race of gods.

Oya Ni Ninu Ko Wa Onigo is a phrase used as a Japanese proverb. Wikipedia reports the following:

“Many Japanese idioms and proverbs also make reference to oni. For example, the expression oya ni ninu ko wa oni no ko (親に似ぬ子は鬼の子?) means literally “a child that does not resemble its parents is the child of an oni,” but it is used idiomatically to refer to the fact that all children naturally take after their parents, and in the odd case that a child appears not to do so, it might be because the child’s true biological parents are not the ones who are raising the child. Depending on the context in which it is used, it can have connotations of “children who do not act like their parents are not true human beings,” and may be used by a parent to chastise a misbehaving child. Variants of this expression include oya ni ninu ko wa onigo (親に似ぬ子は鬼子?) and oya ni ninu ko wa onikko (親に似ぬ子は鬼っ子?). It is also well-known in Japan a game named kakure oni (隠れ鬼?), or more commonly kakurenbo, that means chase the demon and it is the same as the hide-and-seek game that children in western countries play.”

The ill brought about by the workings of “negative” forces has been reported in all ancient cultures throughout the world and is still known to exist today. It is important that in our work, we cultivate energies that will enrich our lives and spiritual well-being. Unfortunately, many have been deceived in this regard. It is with purpose in mind that we share our current digital-theatre presentation. We look forward to hearing from you and do hope you enjoy this work of art. Below is the link to the video:

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