black magic

DISCOVERING THE SIMON NECRONOMICON’S AUTHENTICITY PART 2: FINDING FEAR

Greetings! I would like to thank all those who have taken the time to review the information here at the Necronomicon GateWalker’s Page. If this is your first time visiting us, I suggest you begin your journey by reviewing the articles that appear in the menu located to the right of this page.

 

I know that many of our regular readers can testify to the intensity of the discussions we have had concerning the Four Directional Gates. I thought that it might be good to take a break and discuss one of the many proverbial sayings that are found in the Simon Necronomicon.

 

“I have traveled among the stars, and trembled before the Gods. I have, at last, found the formulae by which I passed the Gate ARZIR, and passed into the forbidden realms of the foul IGIGI….I have found fear.” (Simon Necronomicon pages 6-7)

Once again we see the beautiful word imagery expressed by the Mad Arab in the above passage. Fear is one of the least discussed emotions by mystics and occultists, yet it is one of the most important aspects in our work of evolution. In his famous work Darkness Technology, Mantak Chia makes the following observation on page 26:

“Fear is the oldest negative emotion. It is felt by all animals, and is even stronger among humans since they have so little power to protect themselves, especially the newborn. The longer history organic development makes fear the basis of the entire civilization process: to protect ourselves and achieve our highest potential. Fear is closely connected to the kidney Chi (via the adrenal glands), and when the kidney Chi is diminished, the brain slowly begins to pull back, and disengage from the fantastic worlds of the Divine. The upper brain becomes the observing brain, dedicated to worldly tasks of sending, receiving and processing sensory signals related to daily living.”

The above quote emphasizes Fear as one of the oldest emotions. When we are born the doctor smacks us on the buttocks and fear is induced. Fear is one of the first emotions that we experience in life, yet we are never taught or trained how to make use of fear or master fear within our society. We are only taught how to avoid situations that we fear, and so we live in fear and fear rules what we call civilization today. It is this very same Fear that robs the body of it Chi, as expressed in Mantak Chia’s words above. The result of this fear-induced lifestyle is seen by the billions of aging and dying human beings, since it is this very same fear that robs the body of its vital force, or Chi. For thousands of years the Chinese have associated vibrant health and longevity with both abundant kidney chi and strong libido. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) your kidney chi directs your sexual development and keeps your libido healthy. In essence, improving the health of your kidneys often means increasing the health of your libido. Ironically, the kidneys are ruled by the Goddess INANNA/ISHTAR. So when we read about ISHTAR taking the mes from ENKI (the god of water), we are speaking about the revitalizing effect that water metaphysics has on the kidneys. The Chinese Meridians that are associated with winter are the Kidneys (yin) and the Urinary Bladder (yang). The kidneys are responsible to filtering waste metabolites from the blood and sending the waste product down to the urinary bladder for elimination. The urinary bladder, in return, is responsible to collecting and holding the waste fluids and excreting them as urine. This is what happens on a physical level, but according the acupuncturists, these organs are far more important energetically.

The Kidney Meridian is considered the “Root of Life” because it houses the essence or the prenatal force that we are given from our parents at conception, this essence being yuan chi (Qi). Although this meridian is named for the kidneys, it also includes the adrenals (which physically sit on top of the kidneys.) The adrenal glands secrete a wide array of essential hormones that regulate metabolism, support immunity, and control sexual potency and fertility. (The kidney system also includes what the Chinese call the ‘external kidneys’: the testicles in men and the ovaries in women, so is very important in sexual vitality.) As if that wasn’t enough, the kidney energy controls the growth and development of bone and marrow, which the Chinese consider to also include the brain and the spinal cord.

The Urinary Bladder Meridian is considered the “Minister of the Reservoir” because of its ability to excrete waste products. This meridian is associated with the autonomic nervous system as well. Stress and tension play a key part when bladder chi is dysfunction.

Kidneys are the seat of power, courage and will power. When the kidney chi is vital, one is centered, fearless, rational and clear thinking. One has a gentleness and understanding, a compassion both for self and mankind. But when the energy is imbalanced, there is fear (often accompanied by intense urination, i.e. when you are scared you often feel like peeing!), paranoia, jealousy, suspicion and a lack of moral character.

In Traditional Chinese Medicine the kidneys are associated with the Winter Season.  The winter is attributed to the direction North in the Simon Necronomicon Tradition. North represents the Earth, which denotes NINHURSAG. Juniper oil is an attribute of NINHURSAG (TIAMAT/ISHTAR) according to Ancient Sumerian myth. Ironically, Juniper is a great diuretic in its own right and works to reduce edema and stagnation of lymph.

The Ancient Necromancers of Mesopotamia were not religious in the modern definition of the term, where some over-lording power is looking to punish the imperfect for making mistakes. The Ancient Necromancers recognized the body as a temple that housed emotions and thoughts, which affected its very being. These emotions are created from our reaction to the movement of the stars, the food we eat and etc. The religion of Necromancy starts with our own being. Taoism holds some of the same principles. Taoism is a philosophy that developed in China before the Buddha or Confucius left their stamp on the culture. So effective is it as a template for successful living that it’s survived the transition from East to West, ancient to postmodern, and is now almost the height of fashion (in a philosophical sense) throughout Europe, America and even on our own wee, wild, woolly isles.

It is not a religion, but provides a personal operating system which you install in your body. This is the same philosophy that GateWalkers embrace during their travels to the stars.

In the beginning of our journey through the Gates, we may find ourselves feeling depressed and reflecting on past situations. Some depression is to be expected because the first part of becoming aware is becoming aware of our own fear, and seeing how fear rules the world that we live in by first seeing how it rules us. We may even begin to feel paranoia once we truly see the world for what it is, and this too is a test. Since we have become so accustomed to placing our happiness on events that occur outside of ourselves that we finally get a glimpse of the world through our inner being, and we begin to see things as they really are. Yet this is the first step in the process of awakening, encountering the fear of seeing ourselves for who we truly are. We begin to regret our mistakes. Mistakes that we never realized we committed. Notice what the Mad Arab has to say in his Testimony on pages 13-14 of the Simon Necronomicon:

Henceforth, from that fateful night in the Mountains of MASSHU, I wandered about the country-side in search of the key to the secret knowledge that had been given me. And it was a painful and lonely journey,.”

What we learn from the above passage is that Walking the Gates does not in itself make a person’s life better. It is dealing with the things that we are presented with that improves our lot in life. This is so far from the New Age Sugar-pill that has become so popular today. People think that they can gain a true inner peace by just tinkering away at these “barbie-doll” spells and workings, while still avoiding the path of initiation due to FEAR. Yet even for the GateWalker, the beginning stages can be difficult and the meaning and purpose of the Initiate’s journey must be a sincere one, otherwise he/she will lose their mind.

There is no big club of acceptance, or a plaque, that you receive when you are on this journey of GateWalking. The only reward is the inner peace and a discovery of the universe within. You begin to learn about your “astral family” that has always been watching you and waiting for you lovingly as you mature. Notice what the Mad Arab later expresses on page 14:

I wandered as a beggar, being fed from town to town as the local people saw fit, often being stoned instead and threatened with imprisonment. On occasion, I was able to convince some learned man that I was a sincere scholar, and was thereby permitted to read the ancient records in which the details of necromancy. sorcery, magick and alchemy are given. I learned of the spells that cause men illness, the plague, blindness, insanity, and even death.”

The Mad Arab faced many trials in order to gain an understanding of the working he had seen in a vision. The “stoning and threatening” mentioned above is not literal, but entails the emotional process we have encountered before Walking the Gates and afterwards. We have experienced a “stoning” or critique due to the path we have taken spiritually. We have been “threatened with imprisonment” because what we are learning we must keep to ourselves. Anytime you mention the workings of the Simon Necronomicon people cry “hoax!” Yet they are the first ones to cry out for religious freedom that should be allowed for their “Wiccan” Rites, is it not a made religion patterned after Witchcraft?!!!

The Mad Arab continues on page 14:

“And soon, I cam to understand many things which before I had no knowledge, except perhaps in dreams. The friends of my youth deserted me, and I them. When I was seven years gone from my family, I learned that they had all died of their own hand, for reasons no one was able to tell me; their flocks had been slain as the victims of some strange epidemic.”

It is evident that the Mad Arab faced many horrors on his path to enlightenment. Yet each of us must also face these same horrors. Remember, these are not literal horrors, but symbolic of overcoming our fear. In the above quote, the Mad Arab lost his friends and his family for reasons no one was able to tell him, was symbolic for loosing the need to act on the premise of appearances.

Many people act based on how “good” it will make them look, even if the act is very hospitable. Have you ever noticed how people communicate with you? Have you ever noticed the stories that they tell and the lies that they tell about the things that they are doing in order to make themselves appear “good?” People lie all the time. They act indifferent to their true nature in order to secure relationships with friends and family in their minds. The Mad Arab lost the need to act this way and to act from a place of goodness that is silent. This is not to say that the GateWalker should act without tact in dealing with loved ones and etc. However, as we begin to see the world for what it truly is, we then have the option of acting from a place that is real. We can actually perform acts of goodness because we are not looking for a reward, whether it is a pat on the back, or a trophy. Can you imagine associating with someone who would only spend time with you if you gave them money? This is how the world really operates. The only difference is that the money is self-righteousness.

The Mad Arab was successful in his journey because he was able to learn from his FEAR first. He was then able to change the quality of FEAR to inspiration. Notice his words on page 15 of the Simon Necronomicon:

“In my solitary ceremonies in the hills, worshipping with fire and sword, with water and dagger, and with the assistance of a strange grass that grows wild in certain parts of MASSHU, and with which I had unwittingly built my fire before the rock, that grass that gives the mind great power to travel tremendous distances into the heavens, as also into the hells, I received the formulae for the amulets and talismans which follow, which provide the Priest with safe passage among the spheres wherein he may travel in search of the Wisdom.”

The Mad Arab learned the greatest alchemy of all is Necromancy! Man’s greatest Fear is death, and the reason why the Ancient Alchemist were indeed Necromancers, is due to the fact that learning how to overcome the fear of death (lead) is a step towards turning lead in gold (immortality).  Thus, the Ancient Necronomicon Tradition has always been filled with dark imagery to induce the fear that has to be overcome if we are to evolve spiritually. Therefore, it was a practice amongst the peoples of Ancient Mesopotamia to replace their FEAR, which robbed the kidneys of its Chi with reverence for ENKI (the God of Water) who revitalizes the Chi energy. It is also interesting to note the test that the Mad Arab placed for those who wish to travel upon this journey. Since the uninitiated enjoy doing things for the sake of appearance, the Mad Arab knew that many who read his writing would put themselves on the side of the “good guys.” Yet the very same “bad guys” that are described in the text are the very same gods that we invoke in the workings of the Simon Necronomicon. This is why only the diligent and sincere can grasp the deeper meaning of the text.

I would like to close this with a quote from a book that was given to me by my lovely Sweetheart, who happens to be licensed in the field of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The book is entitled, THE DEMON’S SERMON ON THE MARTIAL ARTS by Issai Chozanshi, on page 150 it states:

“All of the functions of man’s body are operated by ch’i. Thus, a person with a vigorous ch’i will have no illnesses, and will not be sensitive to wind, cold, heat, or dampness. The person whose ch’I is weak will easily become ill, and will be quick to feel pestilential vapors. When the ch’I is infirm, the mind is difficult and body is exhausted. In a medical book it states, ‘The hundred diseases all spring from ch’i.’ The person who does not understand the changes ch’I goes through will not understand how diseases come about. Thus, it is considered fundamental that a man cultivate a vigorous ch’i.”

Now let us look at the words of the Mad Arab on pages 48-49:

“The Ancient One that had escaped into the Inner World was forced back through the Gate by a magician of great power, but only at a great loss to the villages and flocks of the Island. Many sheep were slain after an unnatural fashion, and many devoured, an many Bedou rendered senseless; for the mind perceives what it is shown, but the sight of the Ancient Ones is a blasphemy to the ordinary senses of a man, for that come from a world that is not straight, but crooked, and their existence is of forms unnatural and painful to the eye and to the mind, whereby the spirit is threatened and wrenches loose from the body in flight.

And for that reason, the fearful utukku xul take possession of the body and dwell therein until the Priest banish them back to whence they came, and the normal spirit may return to its erstwhile neighbourhood.”

 

Warlock Asylum

 

 

 

 

 

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