Sexual Preference & Worshipping At The Temple of Ishtar: What Affect Does It Have On Simon Necronomicon Spirituality?


If you think office discussions about politics and race lead to debate, then you have not engaged in any public sexual talk in a long time. First, I’m going to say these next few words just because it needs to be said, but a lot of the historical information presented in today’s discussion also appears in the book, Whoredom Sutra: The Holy Qu’ran of Thelema. Make sure you pick that text up because it bursts the balloon of inaccuracies we may encounter on the topic of ancient civilization in regards to sex.

Are Initiates of the Necronomicon Tradition free to express themselves sexually?

Are Initiates of the Necronomicon Tradition free to express themselves sexually?

Today’s article is divided up into two sections. First, I will talk about the history of alternative sexual behavior in the ancient world. This will be followed by my own observation of the Necronomicon Current in regards to sexuality based on personal experiences. Hopefully, our discussion will not offend anyone, as its aim is to clear up any misunderstanding about the tradition.

Monotheism stands as the demarcation line between a world where “anything goes” sexually and the development of heterosexuality in the present era. When you see people from the Afrocentric community attributing mountains of spiritual bravado to ancient Kemet (commonly known as Egypt), it is because they are only receiving one side of the story. The Fame of Rome, with all its sexual glory and reputation for public orgies, did not hold a candle to the practices engaged in by the Ancient Egyptians. O: The Intimate History of the Orgasm by Jonathan Margolis, illustrates another side of Egyptian life:

“But while following the example of their sexy gods’ potent sexuality was a religious duty for Pharaohs, civil servants and ordinary citizens too are now believed to have aspired to live as sensual as their king’s. Material from excavated middle- and working-class houses….shows that regular Ancient Egyptians covered their walls in explicit, exotic paintings and spent lavishly on their appearance, clothes, make-up, jewelry and perfume – and even dildos, a large collection of which is neatly filed away in wooden drawers deep in the British Museum…..

It would be wrong, nevertheless, to represent Ancient Egypt as some free-love sexual Utopia; it was in no sense a liberal society. Girls were regularly deflowered in arranged marriages at the age of six. Men opted for anal intercourse or vaginal penetration from behind to avoid having to lay eyes on their wife. But a belief pertained that sex was a part of the human condition and, as such, inherently guilt-free. Cleopatra is said to have fellated a thousand men, including a hundred Roman noblemen in one night; the Greeks referred to her as Merichane – ‘gaper’, ‘the ten-thousand-mouthed woman’ and Cheilon – the ‘thick-lipped’.”

The International Handbook of Animal Abuse and Cruelty, edited by Frank R. Ascione, states:

“In Ancient Egypt, crocodile hunters supposedly even practiced sexual intercourse with female crocodiles before killing them.”

The reason many people are not aware of the sexual conduct of the ancient Egyptians, or myths about Set sodomizing Horus (Heru), as discussed in Gates of the Necronomicon, is largely due to the fact that a lot of the erotic artifacts found in well-respected civilizations around the world are hidden from the public at museums and etc. However, it should be understood that if you are working with magic associated with these ancient kingdoms, know how to cultivate its sexual aspect. Otherwise, you will find your family falling apart, can’t find a mate, being mistaken for gay or lesbian, and etc. In Gates of the Necronomicon, take note of how Simon uses the term homosexuality and in conjunction with what rites. Like Egypt, Ancient Mesopotamia also held a view on sex different from what they modern church may find acceptable.  Celibacy in the Ancient World: Its Ideal and Practice in Pre-Hellenistic by Dale Launderville, states:

“In the lamentation “Uru-amirabi,” Ishtar is said to describe herself as one who is,” …… wise. I make right into left. I make left into right. I turn a man into a woman. I turn a woman into a man. I am the one who causes the man to adorn himself as a woman. I am the one who causes the woman to adorn herself as a man.”

In the introductory notes of the Simon Necronomicon, it refers to Ishtar as the “goddess” of the tome itself. This information is captured in the section Goddess of the Witches, which describes Ishtar and Tiamat as two forms of the goddess. (Ninzuwu texts describe Tiamat as the “Ghost Element.”) Here we see another example of the merge between sexuality and the occult. In ancient times, it was thought that magical energy was and is sexual in its origin.

According to the instructions for the gate-walking initiation appearing in the Simon Necronomicon, one is to remain celibate at least for the period of one moon before walking a gate. However, they are allowed to worship at the Temple of Ishtar, but this too “is a big secret.” For a long time I was under the impression that sexual intercourse was fine, so as long as I thought of Ishtar during an orgasm, which is an incorrect application of the instructions appearing in the Simon Necronomicon. It took me quite some time to figure out what is meant by worshipping at the Temple of Ishtar. Encyclopedia of Sex and Gender: Men and Women in the World’s …, Volume 2, edited by Carol R. Ember and Melvin Ember, states:

“Sumerian temple records from the middle of the third millennium BC mention gala priests, who for centuries served the goddess Inanna/Ishtar. These priests and their later equivalents in Babylonia and Assyria adopted female dress and manners and engaged in passive anal intercourse with other men. The written word for gala combine the symbols for penis and anus. Babylonian and Assyrian omens even instructed men to have sex with these priests to bring good luck.“

Anal sex is the only historical precedent for someone worshipping at the Temple of Ishtar. Thus we find that in the Simon Necronomicon to worship at the Temple of Ishtar is a reference to anal sex. Wayne Gray, in a book entitled, Homosexuality, The Bible, The Truth, made the following observation:

“Nonetheless, anal sex was the method for the sex act in the temples.”

In my experience, I can confirm that the ancients view of sex was entirely different from modern man, whether a witch or monotheist. First, we should remember that “romance” and its existence as at first a subject of debate. Meanwhile, the passion expressed by an indigenous people was viewed as an anchor of the realm it originated in.

During my years of gate-walking, anytime I would venture into the realm of the Netherworld, I would “coincidentally” bump into this same gay male after opening Ganzir. This indicated to me that such alternative lifestyles were neither viewed as negative or positive in ancient society, but as a representation of the Netherworld where the energy originates. So I one were to dedicate themselves to an “underworld deity” then they were to accept homosexual, lesbian, and transgender lifestyles as a manifestation of the said deity, or otherworldly influence, operating in their experience.

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5 responses to “Sexual Preference & Worshipping At The Temple of Ishtar: What Affect Does It Have On Simon Necronomicon Spirituality?

  1. hahahahaha this was awesome though i never felt i was wrong or gonna go to hell for being bi this is definitally awesome. The context of sexuality in the west hopefully catches up with what the east has always followed at least in as much as allowed

    Like

  2. wonderful piece of journalism, An open mind can be a blessing and a curse. This kind of Sexual Alchemy is literally playing with Fire & should be treated with the respect it deserves. WORSHIPPING AT THE TEMPLE OF ISHTAR is only for the worthy. Enter at your own peril…

    Liked by 1 person

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